Update – Work in Progress

Hi Everybody,

This is just a short post to show where I have got to with my Scottish themed quilts in progress. I’ve added little bits to three of them and they are now ready to square up, surface quilt and embroider and then bind. Seems like a long way to go still but they are looking a little more promising than when I last posted. These will be the first to be finished and then there will be another two to follow.

First up is my black and white ‘Wind in the West’ mini quilted picture:

IMG_0574

All I have done to this is to add a window and door to the cottage, appliqué  a strip of fencing around the edge of it and pop in a running rabbit (bottom right). I think its’s about ready to quilt now. I’m not sure whether to add a touch of colour or keep it all black and white, or grey . What do you think?

The second one has had a lot more detail added now:

IMG_0578

The cottage has chimneys as well as a door and window and a series of conifers have sprung up around it which I hope gives the scene more depth. I haven’t  decided whether to outline some of the ‘hills’, and continue the quilting lines from one hilly square to another, or to quilt tree shapes here and there. That might mean the quilt ends up being called ‘Into the Woods’ instead of ‘The Glen’

Then there is my mystery quilt. Are you any the wiser? The clue is probably in the crown:

IMG_0576

I shall probably outline-quilt the surrounding squares and rectangles and add some surface embroidery, especially across the seam in the heart and around the edges of the crown. I have stuffed the heart, so that it sits proud of the rest of the quilt because, for me a meaningful heart has to be one that is full.

Ok, time for the big reveal. Ta-da! This mini quilt is a representation of a Luckenbooth, that very old, traditional form of jewellery, usually a brooch and usually wrought in silver, that originated in Edinburgh in the early 1500’s. The design is a heart, or a couple of entwined hearts, sometimes with added gems and almost always topped by a crown. The brooches got their name from the stalls that popped up along  The Royal Mile (Edinburgh’s High Street), a patch of which become known as the “luckenbuiths” or locking booths out of which merchants traded. Although the  Luckenbooth was originally a brooch, as time went on the same motif has been used in various traditional and stylised ways, to fashion rings, pendants, charms, earrings and bracelets.

Here is a simple, inexpensive one I found on Ebay, sold by the jewellers Alexander Castle in Glasgow:

s-l640

As you might expect, the Luckenbooth was a love token, given as an engagement ring might be today but also presented to new-born babies to bestow love and protection. They were also handed down through families from mother to daughter. I found one among my mother’s belongings after she died, a gift from my father almost half a century before.

I wanted to celebrate this lovely Scottish emblem and the sentiment it has carried with it for so long. Maybe my little quilt can be yet another means of sending love down through a family.

Till next time……

 

 

 

 

The Hut on Butterfly Hill

681beab2726368f360f9facf14255ce1

This sample block is from http://www.azpatch.com/ via Pinterest but is not the one I used.

I have always wanted to try making an American traditional School House quilt,  so, after a brief period of R&R after having my stuff on show in a shop, I am trying a few things like this for fun.

I read somewhere that you should never use fabric that was too representational like brick work fabric for the side of a house but I wanted to give it a try and see what I thought about that. I wouldn’t use it again. It does give a harder, flatter look. The whole effect would be much more natural with a neutral background perhaps with a suggestion of bricks embroidered on,  or with just a simple, more unexpected print. It’s OK, though. I can live with it.

There are a number of School House patterns with small differences; I chose the simplest. Here it is once I had wrapped fabric around most of my paper pieces and tacked them. IMG_8099The blue fabric I chose for the background, which I thought was pure cotton had a stretchiness to it which proved to be a nightmare when I used it to back the quilt and will be avoiding anything like that in future. I did consider using the blue in the open window and door to suggest a derelict hut but when I tried a sample it looked rather dull. I wanted the inside of the hut to have a sort of magical glow to it.

I started by sewing all the house pieces together.IMG_8104Here is the back (below) It always looks pretty untidy. You could even up all the folded over edges if you wanted to but the back won’t ever be seen so it doesn’t matter really.IMG_8103

After that I added the sky and then the wide border of  butterfly fabric that would frame the house and give the quilt it’s name. (The butterfly fabric is from the ‘The Botanist’ fabric range by Lewis and Irene that was launched this year)IMG_8107I had cut out the pieces of the frame and begun to sew them onto the hut before I realised that I should have paid more attention to the pattern so that none of the butterflies were cut in half. It isn’t a good look. Lesson learned.

IMG_8108

I didn’t have any more fabric so I couldn’t start again but I did have an idea that might provide a possible solution to the problem.

IMG_8223I cut out a few butterflies from the scraps of left over fabric and attached them to fusible web, planning to applique them on to the quilt to cover the half butterflies. Perhaps even to have one flying past the window. I though it might give the quilt a 3D look. However, I decided it would be too fussy in the end and didn’t use them.

I always get very anxious about making the quilt sandwich and the quilting because I am afraid I’m going to ruin what I’ve already done but it inevitably ends up being the bit I enjoy the most. I suppose it’s because it’s the most creative. For this quilt I mainly used running stitches, in a reddish brown, around the house and the outer edges of the house and the border.  I couldn’t think  of what to put in the gap between the outer edge and the hut that wouldn’t detract from the butterflies but felt it needed something. So, why not more butterflies? I added a different style of butterfly to each of three corners, in two colours. I felt that might draw the eye away from the seams and half butterflies. Does it work? I’m not sure.

Here is the finished quilt” It’s thirteen and a half inches square.

IMG_8209

and here is the back:IMG_8216I love how you can see the shape of the house and the quilted butterflies in the little stitches coming through from the front.

So that’s my first ever School House. I have two more in the pipeline as well as some new takes on a Log Cabin, one of which I hope to show you very soon.

Till next time…..